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Man, it was weird to be in my parent's house and having my parents be like "You city folk don't understand power outages"

When, I've literally lived in that house a large portion of my life than they have.
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
Also power outages in cities are more rare, but much more impactful because no building has a backup generator. I still remember hurricane Sandy in 2012 when the Southern half of Manhattan was plunged into complete darkness, forcing the NYPD to light flares at intersections for several nights.
I gotta admit, I have thought about getting a fair number of lead acid batteries to backup my home.

But to be fair, that's mostly to be powered by solar panels.

Also - why have my parents never bought a backup generator?
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
Because power outages aren't as big of a deal as they let you believe with their city folks contempt?
I mean - their heat is based on their power, so is their water. So - they're pretty screwed with a multiday outage
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
Oof. So either multiday outages are rare (even if hours-long aren't), or they just enjoy the hardship of rural life and this city folk clearly doesn't understand them.
My dad fear was the he wouldn't have internet for his calls in the morning.

Mostly, it's normally an excuse to enter a hotel. So - uh - yeah.
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
Wow! That must have been quite an experience.
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
It was so surreal! And yet, I still was pretty fortunate, as I was living on the northernmost street (26th) without power, so I could go out at night and walk a limited distance before finding civilization again, kind of walking on the edge of an inscrutable precipice.

After a couple days, with my then-partner we had to temporarily move to a friend with power living on the 142th Street because they needed to keep refrigerated a couple of monthly injections for their chronic treatment. Now, normally this 10km trip from the 26th Street would take about 30 minutes by subway, but since the whole public transportation network was shut down because of the power outage, tunnel flooding and felled trees on the roads, we've had to walk all the way. While carrying a picnic cooler with the precious injections and the rest of the frozen products for safe-keeping/temperature control. It ended up taking us about 4 hours including frequent breaks to eat or rest.
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
I lived through a major flood here; it was surreal too. Of course, nothing like you tell with additional complications of having to deal with chronic treatment. You sound brave @Hypolite Petovan!
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
An actual flood sounds way scarier than what I went through. Sure, the hurricane part was impressive, but it only lasted a few days and I was safe in my apartment the whole time. If it hadn't been for the power outage, I personally wouldn't have felt any particular effect as I was walking to work at that time.

Thank you for the compliment, but I guess I did what I got to do on the moment, and even then I knew it would be a fun anecdote to tell people later.
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
I live in a major city with more then 10 million people. We sometimes have blackouts lasting up to 1-2 hours.

I have USP backup units for my server and computer for up to 30-40 mins. Increasing this would be pretty useless, as local network points don't have much longer backups either.

We can have cups of tea or coffee (or cook food) regardless, as I installed a gas stove. A/C units or fans obviously don't work during an outage.
Michael Vogel friendica (via ActivityPub)
I guess when I would live in a region with regular power outages, I would rely upon photovoltaic as primary power source. A suburban or rural house should have enough roof size for solar cells to match the basic power demand. With additional power storage then there shouldn't be a problem even in the night.

Here I only have got an USP for my server at home. However, in the last few years I only needed it once, when at the beginning of the year the power company switched the electric meters. I can remember that once as a kid, more than 30 years ago, I experienced a power outage of more than a few seconds. But nonetheless I'm prepared by having the USP and having several power banks for my devices and also an always charged flashlight.
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
I would rely upon photovoltaic as primary power source


Yep, been there... not as straight forward as I initially thought, @Michael Vogel .

There is no support for this from local authorities. In fact if you if you want to do this officially and link your own solar powered circuits with the power lines provided, you enter a world of pain and bureaucratic nightmares. Generating money by feeding back into the grid for local consumers is almost impossible as the conditions are too onerous.

This leaves most people with solar panels operating in a legally grey area and crucially no return of investment. Initial installation costs and maintenance costs for batteries and panel cleaning/ replacement will prevent you from just breaking even, considering that the cost of electricity here is relatively low.

It's a very different story if you live off-the-grid, but for rural or suburban houses it doesn't really work. Most people who want the comfort of having total power security rely on diesel-powered generators. It's perverse and ironic considering we have sunshine in abundance here. 😞😞
Michael Vogel friendica (via ActivityPub)
Sad to hear. BTW: Where do you live?

The situation here in Germany is bureaucratic as well. And our government does block some development as well. But for example a coworker just installed photovoltaic at his house. He now joins a cooperative that itself act as a power supplier. You have to have a storage at home to join them. So the cooperative can control the power flow. Means: when your solar cells don't generate enough energy then you buy it from the cooperative. In times when you generate enough then the power is stored and when there is demand it will be feed into the grid and is sold on the official market. So the stability of the grid is guaranteed as well.
Canada has a really simple system for joining the grid and adding solar, and I should do it, just the price of initial investment has always been too high. But man, a power co-op sounds so cool to be part of.
Canada has a really simple system for joining the grid and adding solar, and I should do it, just the price of initial investment has always been too high. But man, a power co-op sounds so cool to be part of.
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
a cooperative that itself act as a power supplier

That is so cool! Wish we could do this here too.


Where do you live?

Outskirts of Bangkok
Michael Vogel friendica (via ActivityPub)
Bangkok? Yeah, that's really crazy that photovoltaic isn't the favorite power source there.
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
Mismanagement/ incompetence at state level, was well as a very powerful natural gas lobby. 90% of electricity generation is conventional thermal, mostly natural gas now. Renewable energy is minimal...
Andy H3 friendica (via ActivityPub)
A friend of mine (a German lady) was invited on a local TV show for having a wormbin at home. It was such a thing... in a country where sustainability is an unknown concept.