convenient.email

Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
A very upsetting thread about casual #racism among educated people in Canada. Racism isn’t “somewhere else”, it doesn’t stem from a lack of education, it’s a culture.

Educated white people like me, check yourself.
Trigger Warning: Medical Racism

*Deep Breath* What does medical racism look like for a pregnant Black woman in Ottawa? Well so far...
4 people reshared this
Brother Soul mastodon (AP)
Yeah. FUCK THAT!!

J aka Brother Soul
Adam friendica (AP)
Absolutely... I think that it's unfortunately going to take time to stamp out unless there's a continual adjustment in schools to really make kids aware at an early age. It feels like there's more awareness for the kids now around institutionalized racism than there was in the past, but I don't know that it's going far enough. How we treat indigenous people is one thing... how we treat everyone in general is another.
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
Like I said, it's a culture. If medical school culture keeps being racist, I'm not sure it matters if young kids are taught about institutionalized racism. I like that this is a thing now, but I don't think it will ever be enough as many industries keep promoting racist individuals and practices.
Adam friendica (AP)
Sorry, I apologise for missing some key words there.

You don't think it's possible to buck the culture when it's an important thing to ingrain in to our kids, knowing how hard it might be to fight in areas later in life?
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
It definitely a start, but it won't be enough on its own. Environments like medical schools are exclusive enough to have a culture of their own regardless of the general environment. This means that kids taught about institutionalized racism may end up reneging their teachings once inside one of these environments.
Becky friendica
We really need to work from all angles, and to do that it needs to be recognized from within the home, within the cultural connections via education and outside home activities and from a governmental perspective. And it has to be a consistent awareness from all three at the same time :/.. I mean, absolutely be better, and demand better.
Adam friendica (AP)
I think I'm a little more of an optimist if the kids have the right teachings under their belt - essentially to it being part of their character and having their wits about them enough to know when these problems exist.

I don't know what else we can do beyond start pushing government to get rid of for-profit education - or at least stop subsidizing institutions that are known to breed this sort of thing. That's a big ask, too.
Becky friendica
We all do what we can, which is gonna look different for each person. I would like to be optimistic, but I definitely am hesitant there when I see the effects of social pressures and how it can really change a person. But, I would never say do more than you a capable of. If you have power and can use it, great. I do think teaching children to fight racism is incredibly important, but it's hard for me to see it being enough on it's own
Hypolite Petovan friendica (via ActivityPub)
School is a part of kid's characters, but only a part. The family environment and their own personal sensibility are the two other major parts. So whether such a teaching would stick with all the students is highly debatable. Still worth it, just not the end of it all in itself.

And I'm very much with you on stripping government support from for-profit education. I don't think a ban is in order because it is neither desirable nor realistically achievable, but I'm opposed to the current public support with either accreditation or direct funding.