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Thanks, I hate it.
 
This is 100% a thing I would love to do with my wizards
 
As much as I like combos in card games, in D&D I feel like it completely saps the R out of the RPG.
This entry was edited (5 months ago)
 
You have not played with @silverwizard then. Our games are full of weird rules interactions that drive plot.
 
I have not and I’m sad I’m missing on it. I understand D&D’s structure as a guide for RPG novices who could be overwhelmed by creative storytelling freedom, but when it ends up in nitpicking over obscure rules it’s game over for me.
This entry was edited (5 months ago)
 
I used to be post-D&D and thought I was post "rules heavy" games (@silverwizard introduced me to FATE and it was a rush), then played without them for a while and really missed them. I really enjoyed coming back to playing a bit of D&D, especially the spelljammer one which is at the same time the most D&D game I've encountered and the one I've played that most subverts people's expectations of how a D&D game works.
I personally like game with strong, well defined mechanics that also help players drive plot, choice, and conflict. I'm not really as interested in more free form RPGs any more, when I want something like that I think I'd rather go to an improv meet. I enjoy the way that rules drive fiction and fiction drives plot. D&D is definitely not the best at this, single d20 versus single target as the primary success test is pretty garbage, but I don't think it's only for novices to RPGs who haven't discovered the joys of narrative-driven RPGs. It is good in its niche (and the right level range).
 
See, @Hypolite Petovan this is why he gets on my instance, because he says nice things
 
Oooh, this is how it works! Do you accept snack bribes as a GM as well?
 
Oh, I meant my friendica instance

For gaming - well - I am always happy to game with new people!

I just can't start a new game right now >.<
 
ALSO! Free me from this D&D! THERE'S SO MUCH D&D!

I wanna play some Burning Wheel, or some Myriad Song, or any of the other systems!
 
Just a few more years and we can convert Spelljammer to Burning Wheel. Also: Shadowrun!
 
And I probably can't join a game anyway so it's okay!
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I do like improv, but I still think there is a space for rule-light RPGs without falling into an all-out improv match. Rule-heavy RPGs are much better suited as video games in my opinion.
This entry was edited (5 months ago)
 
Oh, I agree there's a place for rules light RPGs, they're just not for me. As a gamer I'm a rules enthusiast. Even in improv, I enjoy the structured improv games more than the free form scenes.
Having said that, I think I prefer my rules lighter in one-shots.

But I disagree that Rules-heavy RPGS are much better as video games. I completely agree they're not for everybody, but they fill a niche very close to a good complex board game, while still allowing for Roleplay and long running consistent narrative. However, many if not most gamers will probably be put off by constant rules lookup. I enjoy it, but I'm in the minority I believe.
This entry was edited (5 months ago)
 
I for one do not like to stop the flow of the game to check the rulebook. I don't want to care about precise distances or durations in mostly oral games. I do enjoy that precision in video games because all the tedious checks are done sight unseen where only the outcome is presented.

Interestingly, while being on the rule-heavy side, D&D proved to be an awkward base for video games RPG for me because of all the ways the system was apparent. The "real-time" fights felt to me very turn-based because they actually are under the hood.
 
Fuuuuck - I can't play Baldur's Gate because fuuuuuuuuuuuck that game needs to be on a grid to be *fun*
 
I'm a big proponent of Theatre of the Mind when tactical combat isn't the focus. And this can include in even tactics-first, rules-focused games like D&D and Shadowrun. So I don't always care about specific numbers as much as categories (e.g. Close vs Far, Short vs Long).

But sometimes I want to figure out how to fit all the enemies in a cone without getting my allies (or what the tradeoff is), or whether a small localized antimagic field can sit completely inside a Private Sanctum without totally dispelling it. Or whether my character who is cursed to 3 STR can successfully carry his clothes, backpack, and arcane focus (the answer, btw, is just barely; 2 more pounds and he's hobbled; all of a sudden Tenser's Floating Disk and Mage hand have even more value).

Also, 4th ED D&D I think makes for a very good turn-based video or board game.
 
I think it depends on how you do rules heavy. Also - what is the definition of rules heavy.

For me, fast flowing is important, and, like, Shadowrun fails a that a lot, but the places that it slows down emphasises the themes, and that's important.

Rules will, if done well, slow down the parts of the game that matter to the game, and make those moments have tension and weight, and flow quickly the rest of the time.